• If crap places kill people, what can great places do?

    “Crap places kill people.” Christopher Rowe, a Church of Scotland Minister and resident of one of Glasgow’s most impoverished areas made a searingly honest and powerful statement at the first of our Putting People in their Place debates in Glasgow this week. We asked our audience and speakers Rowe, Brian Evans and Christopher Breslin, to […]

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  • Learning from the front line of community led design

    After four fantastic years at The Glass-House, I am leaving at the end of this week to start a new challenge. Here’s what I’ve learned from my experiences: Design heals all wounds – coming together to work on the fundamentals of how to make a place better has the power to resolve tensions within a […]

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  • Debate round-up: How can great places create value for local people?

    ‘How can great places create value for local people?’ was the question posed at the first debate in our national series Putting People in their Place in partnership with The Academy of Urbanism, held in Glasgow on Wednesday 10 October 2012. The setting was an old covered market in Glasgow’s Barras area (Barras Art & […]

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  • The show’s over… let the legacy begin

    Monday’s London parade marked the end of our Olympic summer.  I think that all said, we Brits are pretty pleased with how it’s gone. We delivered a Games to be proud of in a series of sports venues in both established and treasured London destinations, and in our spanking new Olympic Park and sports arenas. […]

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  • Scotland reveals inspired attitudes to community led action

    This year’s DTAS conference ‘Development Trusts – Doing the Business’ brought together over 200 people from the Development Trust movement across Scotland. The Development Trusts themselves are largely made up of volunteers and the sheer amount of work these people put in and the successes they are achieving is incredible, especially in these times of […]

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  • The Glass-House Debate Series 2011/2012: London

    Our final Glass-House Debate of the 2011/2012 series was held earlier this week with our partner Design Council Cabe providing the venue for a discussion on the topic ‘Community Led Design: what is it and does it work?’. With four dynamic and diverse speakers and an engaged audience the evening took us through the many […]

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  • Glass-House Debate – Newcastle

    Once again the topic – Community Led Design: what is it and does it work? – was tackled in the latest Glass-House Debate, held on 21st February. The event was hosted by partners, Northern Architecture, at the Bond Centre in central Newcastle. Sophia de Sousa, Glass-House Chief Executive, introduced the theme and said how glad she […]

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  • Big Insights: What next for community spaces?

    Last week I attended an event organised by Big Lottery Fund to help them consider the future of their funding for community spaces. Various organisations and charities who work with and support local people on public and open space projects were there to listen to others and to share their own experiences. The public space […]

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  • The Community Led Design Debate continues in Bristol

    From the concrete jungle on arrival in Bristol to the thriving regenerated docklands and to the home of our hosts and partner Architecture Centre Bristol, we gathered in the ground floor gallery for the second debate of the 2011/2012 Glass-House Debate Series. A tightly packed group of thirty community led design enthusiasts ready to hear […]

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  • The Glass-House Debate Series 2011/12: Glasgow

    ‘What is Community Led Design and does it work?’ Yesterday evening, on a crisp October evening in Glasgow over 40 guests gathered at The Lighthouse venue (a former newspaper office designed by Glasgow’s master architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh), to explore the mixed perceptions of community led design and what it really means in practice. Four […]

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